Infrastructural Lighting – Parts 2.4 & 2.5

Infrastructural Lighting – Parts 2.4 & 2.5

Componentry

– The emissive layer is a film of organic compound which emits light in response to an electric current
– The core is typically a stack of thin films with a total thickness of around 100-200 nm between 2 planar electrodes
– The current must be distributed uniformly across the electrodes
– The active layers must be protected from environmental damage

COST

– Cost is dependent on the area of the panels rather than the light emitted from the lamps
– Increasing the brightness of the panel will lead to a reduction in cost per kilo-lumen

PRESENT:  STATE OF THE STATE

– MOBILE PHONES, DIGITAL CAMERAS, MP3 PLAYER, OLED LAMPS, WRIST WATCHES
– TELEVISIONS  ARE IN DEVELOPMENT BUT ARE NOT COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE YET

 

 

FUTURE:  PROJECTIONS AND TRENDS

– SAMSUNG invests about $5 billion per year on OLEDs
– PHILIPS goal for 2018 efficacy is 130 lm/W ON A 40cm x 40cm panel
– 40,000 HOUR LIFETIME FROM 3,000 lm/m2
– LG goal for 2015 efficacy IS 135 lm/W ON A 20cm x 20cm panel
– Flexible and transparent panels
– PANASONIC IDEMITSU goal for 2019 EFFICACY IS 130 lm/W ON A 60cm x 60cm panel
– With 40,000 hour lifetime, 15,000 lm/m2

 

Organic Light Emitting Polymers

– Cheaper method of production than OLED production
– Ink jet printing: spraying polymers onto substrates
– Large molecule product opposed to OLED s smaller molecule makeup
– Lightweight and flexible
– Enable full spectrum color displays
– High brightness at low drive voltages
– Glare free viewing
– Long operating times
– Electro-chemical reaction similar to bioluminescence of jellyfish, firefly, certain bacteria/fungi, and deep sea fish
– Does not need backlight
– Easily destroyed by water

 

Join us for the next installment of the Infrastructural Lighting series as we discuss Factors Impacting Life and Performance of LEDs!